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The Cosby Show house
The Cosby Show house Front door of 10 St. Luke's Place in Greenwich Village, used for exterior shots of the Huxtable residence in the 1980s sitcom "The Cosby Show". While the show was set in Brooklyn, the house used for establishing shots was located in Manhattan.
The Cosby Show house
The Cosby Show house 10 St. Luke's Place in Greenwich Village, used for exterior shots of the Huxtable residence in the 1980s sitcom "The Cosby Show". While the show was set in Brooklyn, the house used for establishing shots was located in Manhattan.
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool The Washington Monument, a stone obelisk erected to commemorate President George Washington, was closed for an indefinite period following a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on August 23, 2011. The closure stemmed from extensive damage sustained during the earthquake to the stone that forms the monument. This included a dislodged block in the pyramidion, cracking near the top, and numerous smaller instances of stone damage on the exterior and interior of the structure.



Following detailed inspections of the structure and funding of a repair plan, including a $7.5 contribution from local philanthropist David Rubenstein towards the estimated $15 million cost for repairs, work to repair the structure began in early 2013, as the structure was encased in scaffolding for the third time in its history. Preparations for the scaffolding were underway by February, the scaffolding had reached a third of the way up by late March, and was topped out by May. A lighting system for the scaffolding went live in July. The lighting was discontinued after the night of November 3, and the removal of the scaffolding began the following week, in a process that would take several months to complete.
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool The Washington Monument, a stone obelisk erected to commemorate President George Washington, was closed for an indefinite period following a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on August 23, 2011. The closure stemmed from extensive damage sustained during the earthquake to the stone that forms the monument. This included a dislodged block in the pyramidion, cracking near the top, and numerous smaller instances of stone damage on the exterior and interior of the structure.



Following detailed inspections of the structure and funding of a repair plan, including a $7.5 contribution from local philanthropist David Rubenstein towards the estimated $15 million cost for repairs, work to repair the structure began in early 2013, as the structure was encased in scaffolding for the third time in its history. Preparations for the scaffolding were underway by February, the scaffolding had reached a third of the way up by late March, and was topped out by May. A lighting system for the scaffolding went live in July. The lighting was discontinued after the night of November 3, and the removal of the scaffolding began the following week, in a process that would take several months to complete.
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool The Washington Monument, a stone obelisk erected to commemorate President George Washington, was closed for an indefinite period following a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on August 23, 2011. The closure stemmed from extensive damage sustained during the earthquake to the stone that forms the monument. This included a dislodged block in the pyramidion, cracking near the top, and numerous smaller instances of stone damage on the exterior and interior of the structure.



Following detailed inspections of the structure and funding of a repair plan, including a $7.5 contribution from local philanthropist David Rubenstein towards the estimated $15 million cost for repairs, work to repair the structure began in early 2013, as the structure was encased in scaffolding for the third time in its history. Preparations for the scaffolding were underway by February, the scaffolding had reached a third of the way up by late March, and was topped out by May. A lighting system for the scaffolding went live in July. The lighting was discontinued after the night of November 3, and the removal of the scaffolding began the following week, in a process that would take several months to complete.
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the west end of the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool The Washington Monument, a stone obelisk erected to commemorate President George Washington, was closed for an indefinite period following a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on August 23, 2011. The closure stemmed from extensive damage sustained during the earthquake to the stone that forms the monument. This included a dislodged block in the pyramidion, cracking near the top, and numerous smaller instances of stone damage on the exterior and interior of the structure.



Following detailed inspections of the structure and funding of a repair plan, including a $7.5 contribution from local philanthropist David Rubenstein towards the estimated $15 million cost for repairs, work to repair the structure began in early 2013, as the structure was encased in scaffolding for the third time in its history. Preparations for the scaffolding were underway by February, the scaffolding had reached a third of the way up by late March, and was topped out by May. A lighting system for the scaffolding went live in July. The lighting was discontinued after the night of November 3, and the removal of the scaffolding began the following week, in a process that would take several months to complete.
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the Lincoln Memorial
Washington Monument in scaffolding, viewed from the Lincoln Memorial The Washington Monument, a stone obelisk erected to commemorate President George Washington, was closed for an indefinite period following a 5.8 magnitude earthquake on August 23, 2011. The closure stemmed from extensive damage sustained during the earthquake to the stone that forms the monument. This included a dislodged block in the pyramidion, cracking near the top, and numerous smaller instances of stone damage on the exterior and interior of the structure.



Following detailed inspections of the structure and funding of a repair plan, including a $7.5 contribution from local philanthropist David Rubenstein towards the estimated $15 million cost for repairs, work to repair the structure began in early 2013, as the structure was encased in scaffolding for the third time in its history. Preparations for the scaffolding were underway by February, the scaffolding had reached a third of the way up by late March, and was topped out by May. A lighting system for the scaffolding went live in July. The lighting was discontinued after the night of November 3, and the removal of the scaffolding began the following week, in a process that would take several months to complete.
Christopher Newport Cross
Christopher Newport Cross The Christopher Newport Cross in Richmond, Virginia.
Christopher Newport Cross
Christopher Newport Cross The Christopher Newport Cross in Richmond, Virginia.
Christopher Newport Cross
Christopher Newport Cross The Christopher Newport Cross in Richmond, Virginia.